Last edited by Garan
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

4 edition of Consumer acceptance of irradiated meat and poultry products found in the catalog.

Consumer acceptance of irradiated meat and poultry products

Consumer acceptance of irradiated meat and poultry products

  • 318 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Irradiated meat -- United States,
  • Irradiated poultry -- United States,
  • Consumers -- United States -- Attitudes

  • Edition Notes

    StatementPaul D. Frenzen ... [et al.]
    SeriesAgriculture information bulletin -- no. 757, Issues in food safety economics
    ContributionsFrenzen, Paul D, United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economic Research Service
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination8 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14527159M
    OCLC/WorldCa50654757

    An update on meat irradiation in the USA." Radiation Physics and Chemistry 57(): 2. Aymerich, T., P. A. Picouet, et al. () Decontamination technologies for meat products. Meat Science 78(): 3. Badr, H. M. (). Use of irradiation to control foodborne pathogens and extend the refrigerated market life of rabbit meat.   Pasteurization or sterilization of food by irradiation is a technology useful for all classes of food, especially meat and poultry. The international unit for the dose of radiation absorbed is the gray (Gy), which is equal to rads or 10, ergs per gram.

    Another Assault on Public Health & Consumer Choice Neglect, and Inhumane Treatment inside the U.S. Meat Industry (Prometheus Books, ) As reported earlier, the majority of non-organically produced American meat products are now routinely contaminated with feces, bacteria, and dangerous pathogens such as e-coli, salmonella, and. Frenzen, Paul D. & Majchrowicz, T. Alexander & Buzby, Jean C. & Imhoff, Beth, "Consumer Acceptance of Irradiated Meat and Poultry Products," Agricultural Information Bulletins , United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS).

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that contaminated meat- and poultry-related infections make up to 3 million people sick each year, killing at least 1,—figures that are probably underreported. 1 Crammed into tight confinement areas in massive numbers, factory farm animals often become caked with their own feces. Consumer acceptance of irradiated meat and poultry has important public health implications because irradiation can prevent foodborne illnesses that occur when consumers handle or eat meat or poultry contaminated by microbial pathogens (see box, The Federal Government began allowing food manufacturers to irradiate raw meat and meat products to.


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Consumer acceptance of irradiated meat and poultry products Download PDF EPUB FB2

Consumer Acceptance of Irradiated Meat and Poultry Products (AIB). For additional information about ERS publications, databases, and other products, both paper and electronic, visit the. Consumer Acceptance of Irradiated Meat and Poultry Products. by Paul Frenzen, Alex Majchrowicz, Jean C.

Buzby, Beth Imhoff, and FoodNet Working Group The Federal Government began allowing food manufacturers to irradiate raw meat and meat products to control pathogenic microorganisms in.

Scientists at the University of Georgia surveyed 50 consumers in Atlanta over a year period (–) to determine current consumer attitudes toward irradiation after consuming irradiated ready-to-eat poultry meat products and to evaluate differences in acceptance over that period (Johnson et al., ).

The survey showed that more than Cited by: Consumer acceptance of irradiated foods could affect public health because many foodborne illnesses occur when consumers handle or eat meat or poultry contaminated by microbial pathogens.

However, food manufacturers have been slow to adopt irradiation, partly because of the perception that relatively few consumers are willing to buy irradiated. The Federal Government began allowing food manufacturers to irradiate raw meat and meat products to control pathogenic microorganisms in February Consumer acceptance of irradiated foods could affect public health because many foodborne illnesses occur when consumers handle or eat meat or poultry contaminated by microbial by:   Demand for irradiated food products depends on acceptance by consumers.

Although public knowledge about irradiation continues to be limited, interest in purchasing safety‐enhanced irradiated food is increasing, especially after people receive information about potential benefits and.

Sensory characteristics and consumer acceptance of electron‐beam irradiated commercial samples of ready‐to‐eat meats (frankfurters and diced chicken) were evaluated. Samples were removed from their. Irradiation is one of the best methods to control pathogenic microorganisms in raw poultry meat, and its use in red meat has been approved.

However, irradiated meat produces off-odors, which significantly impact consumer acceptance of the meat. Controlling off-odor production and improving consumer acceptance of irradiated poultry meat will be very important for the poultry industry as it.

Irradiation can be a useful control measure in the production of several types of raw or minimally processed foods such as poultry, meat and meat products, fish, seafood, and fruits and vegetables. Irradiating food products provides one means of addressing the foodborne illness issue by significantly reducing the presence of foodborne bacteria and diseases.

The objective of the study is to develop an empirical model to estimate the likelihood of consumer acceptance of irradiated seafood products and, more specifically, their willingness to. Consumers view irradiated meat and poultry products positively, with half or more interested in purchase.

thought of as new ways to foster consumer acceptance and. Irradiation of meat, poultry, and other foods helps to preserve food quality and to prevent foodborne disease.

This review examines current acceptance and use of irradiated foods in consumer food products and institutional food service applications. However, there was no difference in consumer acceptance by any of the foodborne illness risk factors.

It is unclear why persons at increased risk of foodborne illness were not more willing to buy irradiated products, which could reduce the hazards they faced from handling or undercooking raw meat or poultry contaminated by microbial pathogens.

The approval of irradiation for poultry was sought by the United States Department of Agriculture, which regulates meat and poultry products, and Radiation Technology Inc. of.

The recent approval of irradiation for raw meat and meat products covers both refrigerated and frozen products. Temporary approval was also granted for irra-diating prepackaged meat and poultry products using any of the 1 USDA/ERS AIB/August Consumer Acceptance of Irradiated Meat and Poultry Products.

Frenzen P, Buzby J, Majchrowicz A, DeBess E, Hechemy K, Kassenborg H, Consumer acceptance of irradiated meat and poultry in the United States.

Program and Abstracts Book, International Conference on Emerging Infectious DiseasesAtlanta, Georgia July. Get this from a library. Consumer acceptance of irradiated meat and poultry products. [Paul D Frenzen; United States. Department of Agriculture.

Economic Research Service.;]. It is noteworthy that, in consumer acceptance studies reported by Lee et al. (), consumers preferred the colour of irradiated, raw and cooked turkey meat to non-irradiated controls, because the pink colour of the irradiated meat made it appear fresher. It was concluded that the combined use of aerobic packaging and antioxidants could be.

The products must be labelled to include an international symbol on packaging — usually a green plant inside a circle. The U.S. has allowed meat to be treated for years, but that country’s Food and Drug Administration noted that consumers’ acceptance had been slowed by confusion over how irradiation works and what it does.

Consumer acceptability of interventions. In general, the acceptability of interventions by consumers is a potentially important determinant for government decision making as effective policy initiatives are reinforced by public preferences and concerns (Cope et al., ).Consumers may be more willing to accept new interventions where they have a role in choosing these themselves rather.

There is continual interest in irradiation as a food-safety intervention among US meat and poultry processors because of the new E. coli strains and Salmonella in beef and poultry; it is also of.Chapter 10 CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE AND MARKETING OF IRRADIATED FOODS Ronald F.

Eustice1and Christine M. Bruhn2 1Minnesota Beef Council, Minneapolis, USA 2Center for Consumer Research, Department of Food Science & Technology, University of California, Davis, USA Abstract: Public concern about food safety has increased.

Despite efforts to con.That limitation may be particularly relevant in this case because the survey did not mention the higher cost of irradiated products, they note. Frenzen PD, DeBess EE, Hechemy KE, et al.

Consumer acceptance of irradiated meat and poultry in the United States. J Food Protection ;64(12)